Sep 1, 2021 • 21M

Podcast: Let There Be Light? FDR Is In The Dark (2)

It's August, 1938. President Roosevelt is About to Learn the Limits of His Popularity in Georgia. And it's Going to be Awkward.

Annette Laing
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Hate history in high school? Meet Dr. Annette Laing, the Non-Boring Historian, Renegade Professor, and Brit in the US. Bringing you fascinating stories in American and British history, liberated from academic-speak.
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President Roosevelt at podium on outdoor stage
President Franklin D. Roosevelt speaking to crowds in Lamar County, August 11, 1938. Image: Public Domain.

Podcast: 21 mins. Continued from Let There Be Light? FDR Is In The Dark (1)

It’s August 11, 1938. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt has traveled from the Little White House, his getaway in Warm Springs, Georgia, to the small town of Barnesville. He's here to celebrate a triumph of the New Deal, the arrival of electricity in a rural area where he got 92% of the vote. He's addressing thousands of excited locals and the national media. He’s going to press the switch that will bring electricity to Lamar County for the first time.

How could he possibly screw this up?

Hold the president’s beer. You’re about to find out.

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This is the podcast version of Annette’s original post at Non-Boring History:

Non-Boring History
Let There Be Light? FDR Is In the Dark: 1938 (Part 2)
Continued from Let There Be Light? FDR Is In the Dark: 1938 (Part 1) Now, where are we? Barnesville Georgia, August 11, 1938 Back on the football field of Gordon Military College in Barnesville, 50,000 people, apparently an all-white crowd, are listening to Pr…
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